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Flashback Friday: Forgotten Gems

FlashBack Friday (click for previous episodes)

So this week I've been rollin' through some archive songs and thought I'd share some of my forgotten gems. You may agree with some, you may not have heard many, but for me to think they're forgotten, there is no way they are bait.

Usually with these kinda dig the vault themes you remember every song 'cos they're the same ones everyone says "Oh remember x tune?" but it's bait. I'm sure you've been in a rave and the DJs like "Who remembers this one?" even though he knows he plays it every week meaning we hear it every week.

(Disclaimer: I'm based in London, UK so in your ends they may be the type of tunes I mentioned above. Oh and I'm mid-late 80s born, so it's from my time but a forgotten tune).

Anyway, here goes

Foxy Brown Stylin'

This is from her album Ill Nana The Fever. I'm not sure if this album ever actually got released. Leaked out there though. Westwood used to bang this hard. The way this is chopped sounds like an unfinished version so I wonder if it ever saw the light of day.



There was a remix with NORE, Loon and Baby plus Foxy's borther Young Gav. Think Young Gav produced this. There were rumours around this time of a romance between Foxy and Baby.

Jerzee Monet featuring DMX Most High

This tune was big! Message, social-commentary, unique tone, nice beat, and X. Released in '03. Heavily slept on. I've just realised who Jonelle Monae's name kept reminding me of. From what I remember, Monet is pronounced like Moet, with a N in the middle.



Here's a link to the video
but the sound quality is poor.

Redman Da Goodness

I'm sure Red & Meth performed this during their infamous performance at the MOBO's. I know this is Red and Busta but I'm sure they did it.



Limp Bizkit Rollin'

Remember when the lines between racket and hip hop started to blur? This was one of those songs that everyone appreciated. Thumbs up if you knew about Fred Durst of Limp Bizkit from Eminem lol. I'm sure this was their one and only UK #1. Linkin Park were the real deal when it came to this type of music.



Ruff Ryders feat Juvenile Down Bottom

Lifted from Ruff Ryder's debut album back in the late 90s, the most underrated Drag-On, with Cash Money's bread winner at time Juvenile. Cash Money along with No Limit were the main ones I knew of at the time from Down South. Rap-a-Lot didn't come up on my radar them times.



Ginuwine What's So Different

R&B's nearly guy Ginuwine had a hard time of life. Broke through as the singing, dancing, ladies man just before Usher's 'U Make Me Wanna' then My Way album stepped on him commercially. Sisqo followed through that door and brought out his stuff just as this song was about to do things. He never ever was that guy. Even Justin Timberlake kicked through the door and said "Sorry mate, it's either me or Usher in this lane, pal." I've just realised something, reckon Timbo saw what he couldn't do with Ginuwine in Justin?

(Disclaimer: the above is all based on memory. I would go and quantify the information but that isn't organic. I want this to be organic.)

Anyway, back to the tune. This is a banger! Timbo's the king with them insane drum patterns. Even features a sample of Godzilla. I still don't get the video.



To show the difference between me and them other people that do flashback's, you would have just been shown an obvious track like In Those Jeans or Pony. Levels.

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